Posted by: wadahp | July 19, 2011

“TWILIGHT AT THE TEMPLE” FUNDRAISER

south tacoma

South Tacoma loves its classic cars-now the South Tacoma business district is focused on its classic historic buildings.  A restored historic building can provide a neighborhood with glamour, charm, and the added benefits of a revitalized business district.  Between 2000 and 2004 investment in historic rehabilitation projects in Washington State generated $221 million in sales, created jobs, and revitalized historic business districts.

On August 6th, 2011, Historic Tacoma and the South Tacoma Business District Association are hosting a workshop on Economic Incentives for Façade Restoration.  This half-day workshop showcases resources that can assist building and property owners with the rehabilitation process: the brick and mortar of façade restoration, financial incentives from the city’s special tax valuation and façade improvement programs, and case studies from property owners that have transformed their buildings. Presentations by local architectural firms including Belay Architecture, BLRB Architects, and Eysaman & Company will showcase before and after images of transformed commercial storefronts, illustrating how buildings that have been altered in the past can have their presence restored.  Historic buildings in South Tacoma’s commercial district will provide many of the case studies.  Representatives from the City of Tacoma’s Department of Community and Economic Development and the Historic Preservation Office will discuss various financial resources and incentives, including the financial benefits of listing a historic building on Tacoma’s Register of Historic Places. Concluding the workshop is a discussion with property owners who have already gone through the rehabilitation process and taken advantage of the historic preservation special tax valuation incentives.

The workshop is from 9am-12pm on August 6th, 2011, at Stonegate Pizza on South Tacoma Way. Attendance is free and participants are welcome to stay after the event for additional discussion and a no-host lunch of Stonegate’s fabulous pizza.

RSVPs encouraged by August 1 to info@historictacoma.org  

Questions? Contact Lauren Perez at (323) 637-9909 or lkp2114@columbia.edu.

Posted by: wadahp | July 18, 2011

THURSTON COUNTY HERITAGE GRANT PROGRAM INFORMATION

Heritage Grant Program

Background

The Thurston County Heritage Grant Program provides resources to assist in the collection, preservation, and interpretation of Thurston County’s heritage.  On behalf of the Board of County Commissioners, the Thurston County Historic Commission administers the Thurston County Heritage Grant Program  to assist projects that promote the public’s access to County history.

The program is funded with a portion of document recording fees collected by the Thurston County Auditor.  The allocation of these fees for projects that “promote historical preservation or historical programs, which may include preservation of historic documents” is authorized under RCW 36.22.170.  The revenues accrue to a dedicated fund and may not be used for any purposes other than those stipulated in the statute.

2012 Thurston County Heritage Grant Program

Naumann House in Tumwater

2012 Heritage Grant Applications will be accepted July 15, 2011 through August 31, 2011.

How to apply:

  • Grant Program Guidelines: Review the Guidelines for information on eligibility, application process, review process and additional helpful information
  • Application Form: The form may be filled out online or printed and filled out by hand.  Download the latest Adobe Reader to allow you to save information you have typed into the form.
Posted by: wadahp | July 13, 2011

A WELCOME TO NICHOLAS VANN TO DAHP AND WASHINGTON

It is with great pleasure that SHPO Allyson Brooks and DAHP welcome Nicholas Vann to fill Stephen Mathison’s position as the State Historical Architect. Nicholas will assume his new duties at DAHP’s Olympia office as of August 1, 2011.

Nicholas comes to Washington from New Orleans where he currently works as a project manager at Trapolin-Peer Architects. A native of Tempe, Arizona, Nicholas gained his Bachelors and Masters degrees in Architecture and a second Masters degree in Preservation Studies, all from Tulane University.  In addition to working or interning with architecture firms in New Orleans and Phoenix, Nicholas also interned at the Vieux Carre Commission in New Orleans, one of the earliest local historic preservation decision-making bodies in the nation. In addition to his education at Tulane (with a semester at Arizona State University due to the impact of Hurricane Katrina), Nicholas participated in study-abroad projects in Central and South America as well as Rome. He is a member of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, American Institute of Architects-New Orleans Chapter, and Alpha Rho Chi, a professional architecture fraternity.

Nicholas is looking forward to his move to Washington, his work as Historical Architect, and engaging in the state’s historic preservation and architecture communities.


Posted by: wadahp | July 13, 2011

END OF AN ERA: STEPHEN MATHISON RETIRES FROM DAHP

Long-time Historical Architect Stephen Mathison retired from State service and the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation on June 30, 2011. His departure after over 31 years marks the end of an era for the agency and for the field of historic preservation in Washington.

A product of the WSU architecture program and stalwart Cougar fan, Stephen joined the Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation in 1978. As Historical Architect, Stephen was responsible for interpreting and applying the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation (Standards) to development projects across the state affecting significant historic buildings and structures. In his position, he reviewed hundreds of projects seeking to take advantage of the federal Investment Tax Credit (ITC) program. His review was key to making sure that proposed designs met the Standards and thus being qualified to take advantage of the tax incentives. Stephen’s reviews resulted in the qualification of millions of dollars in private investment in historic buildings whose fate otherwise may have been alteration, deterioration, or demolition.

Stephen’s career and achievements were honored and celebrated at a June 23rd reception at the Dearborn House in Seattle. Obviously, it would be a very lengthy blog post to recap  the work and accomplishments that Stephen made during his years with DAHP. However, at the June 23rd reception, the many colleagues, friends, and family who attended the gathering, recognized the legacy of his work that fostered the preservation of our historic built environment and revitalization of historic downtowns and neighborhoods. Indeed, Stephen himself acknowledged that the most satisfying aspect of his career was his role in realizing the long-term preservation of buildings in all corners of the state. Though in addition to this legacy and going beyond his technical skills in design and preservation, Stephen was also honored for his dedication to providing the best in public service to the many stakeholders with whom he had contact over the span of his career.               

As a gift to Stephen, State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) Allyson Brooks and DAHP staff engaged the assistance of HistoryLink.org Historian Jennifer Ott to create a HistoryLink essay on Mathison Park in Burien. For some background, Stephen’s father donated the family property to the City of Burien in 1999, after having lived there for nearly 60 years. Here, Ted and Bernadine Mathison raised Stephen and his four siblings imbued with a sense of stewardship, self-sufficiency, and service to the community. Ted’s donation of the land and residence to the City, sparked the creation of 5 acre park. After Ted’s passing in 2003, Stephen and his three brothers and sister have worked closely with the Parks and Recreation Department to plan and develop the parcel with trails, park furniture and playground equipment. To read the full history of Mathison Park, visit http://www.HistoryLink.org. In realizing this gift, DAHP expresses its appreciation to HistoryLink.org’s Jennifer Ott and Marie McCaffrey for their commitment and support to craft the Mathison Park essay and bring it on-line to share with the community and future generations.

Allyson and DAHP staff join in wishing the best to Stephen in his retirement and future globe-trotting adventures. And, we extend our deep appreciation to him for 31 years of exemplary service to historic preservation and the people of Washington.


 

Vancouver, WA—The Fort Vancouver National Trust and the City of Vancouver are opening the doors to the renovated Artillery Barracks Building on Friday, July 15 at 10:30 a.m. Mayor Pro Tem Larry Smith will help cut the ribbon. Smith is a retired Army Colonel and served as Senior Army Advisor from Fort Lewis to the Commander of the 104th Division at Vancouver Barracks. The Trust and the City will be joined by the National Park Service, the Washington State Historical Society and the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation. After the ceremony, free public tours of the renovated space will be offered.

The ceremony recognizes a renovation of the south porch and 6,500 square feet of interior space in the east wing first floor of the building, which will be available to rent for private events and public programs. The space includes a board/conference room, break-out workshop space, banquet room with catering kitchen and full accessibility.

Original architectural details that were preserved include the open floor plan, white oak tongue-and-groove floors, pressed tin ceiling tiles, interior and exterior columns and steam heat radiators. Period-appropriate reproduction light fixtures were added.  The architect for the historic renovation was Paul Falsetto of Carleton Hart Architecture and the general contractor was Payne Construction.

When the 40,000-square-foot Artillery Barracks opened in 1904, it housed two artillery batteries, or 240 soldiers. The building has most recently served as offices for the Army, but has been vacant since the mid nineties. The West Barracks is owned by the City of Vancouver, with the Fort Vancouver National Trust holding the lease for the buildings.

In addition to the renovation of the Artillery Barracks Building, the Trust has also assumed management of the adjacent Red Cross Building for events and programs. The public may now utilize this facility with a choice of caterer, as is the policy for the Artillery Barracks Building. In addition to the Artillery Barracks Building tour, the public may also tour the Red Cross Building. To rent event space in the Artillery Barracks or Red Cross buildings, call Julie Kummer, the Trust’s event facilities manager, at 360-828-5237.

Posted by: wadahp | July 11, 2011

NEW GUIDANCE FROM ACHP ON TRIBAL CONSULTATION

Limitations on the Delegation of Authority by Federal Agencies to Initiate Tribal Consultation under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act

delegation memo final 7-1-11

A federal agency is allowed, in some circumstances, to delegate to its applicants the responsibility to initiate consultation pursuant to the regulations that implement Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), “Protection of Historic Properties” (36 CFR Part 800). The provision in Section 800.2(c)(4) of the regulations has been used frequently by federal agencies such as the Federal Communications Commission, the Surface Transportation Board, and the Department of Health and Human Services. Although federal agencies can delegate this responsibility without the involvement of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP), inquiries are often made about the applicability of this authority regarding consultation with Indian tribes. This guidance clarifies the restrictions on the use of this provision regarding Section 106 consultation with Indian tribes.

Federal agencies are required to consult with Indian tribes on a government-to-government basis pursuant to Executive Orders, Presidential memoranda, and other authorities. Section 800.2(c)(2)(ii)(B) of the ACHP’s regulations remind federal agencies that “the Federal Government has a unique legal relationship with Indian tribes set forth in the Constitution of the United States, treaties, statutes, and court decisions. Consultation with Indian tribes should be conducted in a sensitive manner respectful of tribal sovereignty. Nothing in this part alters, amends, repeals, interprets or modifies tribal sovereignty, any treaty rights, or other rights of an Indian tribe, or preempts, modifies or limits the exercise of such rights.”

Section 800.2(c)(2)(ii)(C) of the ACHP’s regulations further reminds agencies that “consultation with an Indian tribe must recognize the government-to-government relationship between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. The agency official shall consult with representatives designated or identified by the tribal government.”

Moreover, Section 101(d)(6)(B) of the NHPA specifically requires that “in carrying out its responsibilities under [Section 106], a Federal agency shall consult with any Indian tribe … that attaches religious and cultural significance to [historic properties that may be affected by the undertaking.”

Accordingly, the authorization to applicants to initiate Section 106 consultation does not apply to the initiation of consultation with Indian tribes unless expressly authorized by the Indian tribe to do so.

Indian tribes may certainly choose to meet with applicants that would like to initiate Section 106 early in project planning. However, federal agencies cannot unilaterally delegate their tribal consultation responsibilities to an applicant nor presume that such discussions substitute for federal agency tribal consultation responsibilities.

Finally, Section 800.2(c)(4) of the ACHP’s regulations states that “Federal agencies that provide authorizations to applicants [to initiate consultation] remain responsible for their government-to-government relationships with Indian tribes.” Simply stated, Indian tribes are not obligated by statute or regulations implementing Section 106 to consult with applicants. And, nothing in the Section 106 regulations is intended to (or could) waive tribal rights to government-to-government consultation. Accordingly, it is not appropriate to assume that the lack of written or verbal response by a tribe to an applicant’s outreach signifies a lack of interest in the project or waiver of its right to consultation during its review under Section 106.

In circumstances where an Indian tribe agrees to allow a federal agency to authorize an applicant to initiate or carry out Section 106 consultation for a particular program or undertaking, the ACHP recommends that any such delegations be articulated in written agreements between the federal agency and the Indian tribe to avoid confusion. Any such agreement, however, should include a provision that requires the federal agency to reenter the consultation process at any time at the request of the Indian tribe since the federal agency remains responsible for government-to-government consultation. Finally, federal agencies should ensure that applicants fully understand the role of Indian tribes in the Section 106 process and, have clarified what is required to ensure that Indian tribes are afforded a meaningful opportunity to participate.

Posted by: wadahp | July 11, 2011

EVERGREEN MUSE: THE ART OF ELIZABETH COLBORNE

An Exhibition and Lecture of Interest to People interested in the regional Arts and Crafts Movement

EVERGREEN MUSE: THE ART OF ELIZABETH COLBORNE
June 17 –September 25, 2011
Whatcom Museum
250 Flora Street
Bellingham, Wa. 98225
Tuesday through Sunday, Noon – 5 pm
(360) 778-8930

The Whatcom Museum presents this first comprehensive exhibition of the art of Elizabeth Colborne. As one of Bellingham’s most accomplished early artists, she developed a national reputation as a successful illustrator, painter and printmaker.

Drawn primarily from the Whatcom Museum permanent collection, the works display the rich variety of her technical abilities and showcase her special love for the landscape of the Pacific Northwest. Many of these were created from subjects located within a few miles of the museum.

As a major contributor to the regional Arts & Crafts Movement, Colborne was one of the few local artists to have studied with Arthur Wesley Dow (1857-1922), an important artist and teacher whose influence in American art history is unparalleled. That influence can be seen in her use of sophisticated compositional elements, her harmonious color balance, and the adaptation of local subject matter within a Japanese-inspired aesthetic. For most of her adult life, Colborne divided her time between New York City, the base for her professional career, and her beloved hometown that remained the source of her most inspired work.

Lecture and book signing by guest curator and catalogue author, David F. Martin, Sunday, July 10, 2:00 pm at the Whatcom Museum, Bellingham.

Posted by: wadahp | July 11, 2011

WSDOT, BURKE TEAM UP TO HOUSE WORK-ZONE ARTIFACTS

Museum to preserve historical objects found during road construction

SEATTLE–Construction crews digging into Seattle-area highway projects find more than just dirt below their work zones. They find artifacts – century-old bottles, shoes, and other everyday objects – that tell a story about the region’s long-buried past.

To house a growing collection of artifacts unearthed by highway crews, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) is funding an expansion of the Burke Museum’s offsite storage facility. WSDOT’s $342,000 contribution will create storage space for 4,600 new boxes and add a new climate-control system to aid in the preservation of sensitive collections.

“The storage expansion project will result in the best care and curation of archaeological objects found by the state and ensure accessibility for research purposes,” said Steve Denton, archaeology project manager for the Burke Museum.

WSDOT has a staff of archaeologists who work with “mega projects” to assess and identify materials found during construction. The Burke Museum was identified as the only state-approved institution that would be qualified to curate all the potential materials expected for the Alaskan Way Viaduct and SR 520 projects.

“By caring for this material, our community can better learn about our past,” said Kevin Bartoy, cultural resources specialist for WSDOT. “Future generations can conduct studies about aspects of our local history that aren’t typically recorded, particularly communities underrepresented in the historical record but key to the development of our present, such as racial and ethnic minorities, women, and the working class.”

The Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture is located on the University of Washington Seattle campus. Founded in 1899, the Burke holds more than 14 million objects in its collections ranging from plants and mammals to fossils and cultural objects. For more information on the archaeology division of the Burke Museum, contact archy@u.washington.edu.

Posted by: wadahp | June 29, 2011

DAHP'S INVENTORY FORMS GO GLOBAL!

From Derek Chisholm (Preservation Consultant in Washington and Oregon) – to Allyson Brooks (SHPO):

Hegui Tulou

Kuikei Tulou

Tianluokeng group

As you may know, I am working in China for about a month. After presenting a couple of papers in Beijing, I have joined a group of mostly graduate students for a preservation project in rural Fujian Province. We are working on a preservation plan for Tianzhong village and its historic Tulous. Tulous are rammed earth buildings dating from 100 to 700 years old that were built by the Hakka people. (See low-res photos attached).

Today, the team started an inventory of the village’s built environment. A 3D model will be developed as well as an analysis of cultural preservation and cultural tourism issues. The team consists of some Masters and PhD students from Sichuan, Xiamen Universities, and the Universities of Venice, Oregon and Washington. I led the team in the inventory work. After letting them develop some drafts methods and procedures, I stepped in and facilitated the final version. We gathered data digitally with Trimble GPS devices which geocodes the location and is married with a range finder for triangulated measurements of the buildings.

Can you guess what other data we collected and how?

We used the DAHP Field Form!

Actually we modified it a little, and obviously won’t be submitting the information to you. But here I am in China giving a lecture on how to use your form, how it is the best of all the SHPOs with whom I have worked, and how you are building a digital database that is searchable by researchers and other historians. I thought that you would appreciate knowing.

Posted by: wadahp | June 29, 2011

DAHP’S INVENTORY FORMS GO GLOBAL!

From Derek Chisholm (Preservation Consultant in Washington and Oregon) – to Allyson Brooks (SHPO):

Hegui Tulou

Kuikei Tulou

Tianluokeng group

As you may know, I am working in China for about a month. After presenting a couple of papers in Beijing, I have joined a group of mostly graduate students for a preservation project in rural Fujian Province. We are working on a preservation plan for Tianzhong village and its historic Tulous. Tulous are rammed earth buildings dating from 100 to 700 years old that were built by the Hakka people. (See low-res photos attached).

Today, the team started an inventory of the village’s built environment. A 3D model will be developed as well as an analysis of cultural preservation and cultural tourism issues. The team consists of some Masters and PhD students from Sichuan, Xiamen Universities, and the Universities of Venice, Oregon and Washington. I led the team in the inventory work. After letting them develop some drafts methods and procedures, I stepped in and facilitated the final version. We gathered data digitally with Trimble GPS devices which geocodes the location and is married with a range finder for triangulated measurements of the buildings.

Can you guess what other data we collected and how?

We used the DAHP Field Form!

Actually we modified it a little, and obviously won’t be submitting the information to you. But here I am in China giving a lecture on how to use your form, how it is the best of all the SHPOs with whom I have worked, and how you are building a digital database that is searchable by researchers and other historians. I thought that you would appreciate knowing.

Posted by: wadahp | June 27, 2011

DAHP RELEASES PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS

You may have noticed that the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation did not put out an Historic Preservation Month poster in 2011…the reason being that we were working on something new this year.  In conjunction with TVW on the production end and the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation and the Main Street Program, DAHP is pleased to present our first PSAs on historic preservation in Washington!  Please check them out:

The McLoughlin House Unit (in Oregon City, Oregon) of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site presents its 2011 Summer Event Calendar.

Victorian Handcraft Demonstrations
This ongoing hands-on demonstration series features a variety of Victorian needlework and handwork techniques. Experience for yourself this important aspect of the lives of ladies in the 1800s! All programs are free of charge.

Saturday, July 9, 12:00-4:00 p.m.
Knotted Fringe
Need the perfect finish for a shawl or table runner?  Learn different ways to tie decorative knotted fringe.

Saturday, August 13, 12:00-4:00 p.m.
Nature Prints
Learn how to use Nature’s bounty to create unique and delicate images.

Saturday, September 10, 12:00-4:00 p.m.
Bead Fringe
Create elegant bead fringes to embellish clothing and home décor items.

Kids Dig – July 9 and August 13, 11 a.m.
Children ages 8-12 are introduced to archaeology by participating in a “dig”, mapping their artifact finds, and filling out site forms. As they excavate and screen with the help of park staff and volunteers, we will discuss how we learn from archaeology, and why we should preserve these pieces of our past.

Limited to 20 children on a first-come, first-served basis.

Brown Bag Lectures
Munch your lunch while you learn about the Civil War from local experts.
All programs are free of charge, lunch not provided.

Thursday, June 16, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

From 1670 to the Civil War: Local Perspectives

Speaker: Marge Harding

Thursday, July 21, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
John Brown and the Bleeding Kansas Affair

Speaker: Matthew MacDonald

Thursday, August 18, 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Civil War Causes and Consequences: a Western Perspective
Speaker: Greg Shine

Music on the Lawn with “Heartstrings”
Saturday, July 9, 2011 12:00 noon

Bring a blanket or lawn chair and join us for an afternoon of toe-tapping fun with local musical duo, “Heartstrings.” All programs are free of charge.

Background:
The McLoughlin House was added to the National Park System in 2003 as a unit of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. The house is restored to honor the life and accomplishments of John McLoughlin, the “Father of Oregon.” The graves of McLoughlin and his wife Marguerite are next to the house, as is the home of Dr. Forbes Barclay, a Hudson’s Bay Company associate, and his wife Maria. Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, a unit of the National Park Service, is the heart of the Vancouver National Historic Reserve. The Vancouver National Historic Reserve brings together a national park, a premier archaeological site, the region’s first military post, an international fur trade emporium, one of the oldest operating airfields, the first national historic site west of the Mississippi river, and a waterfront trail and environmental center on the banks of the Columbia River. The partners of the Reserve teach visitors about the fur trade, early military life, natural history, and pioneers in aviation, all within the context of Vancouver’s role in regional and national development. The Reserve’s vast array of public programs — including living history events, festivals, cultural demonstrations, exhibits, active archaeology, and other special activities — create a dynamic, fun, and unique tourist destination for people of all ages.

VANCOUVER, WA – Superintendent Tracy Fortmann has announced the 2011 Public Archaeology Field School at Fort Vancouver

Portland State University, Washington State University Vancouver, the National Park Service, Northwest Cultural Resources Institute, and the Fort Vancouver National Trust are pleased to announce the tenth field school in historical archaeology at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

“This unique National Park Service program is a signature educational program for the Pacific Northwest,” said Fortmann. “For ten seasons, this school has trained undergraduate and graduate students from around the nation, and internationally, in historical archaeology and the preservation of cultural resources.”

This year’s field school will continue its exploration of Fort Vancouver’s multicultural Village (also known as “Kanaka Village”). This colonial village was the largest settlement in the Pacific Northwest in the 1830s and 1840s. It contained people from all over the world and the Pacific Northwest, including Native Hawaiians, the Métis, and people of many different American Indian tribes. The field school will provide a means to recapture the history of this multicultural worker’s village and to engage the modern Portland/Vancouver area in the unique history of their closest National Park site.  “It is fitting that this program’s tenth year is focused on the Village as it symbolizes the early history of diversity in the Pacific Northwest,” said Doug Wilson, Director of the NPS-Northwest Cultural Resources Institute and Adjunct Associate Professor at Portland State University.  “The partnership with the universities has allowed us to better understand the lives of this multicultural community from the things they left behind.  This legacy project allows us to better understand our own increasingly diverse Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area.”

In a new component of the field school, students will help to record the condition of grave markers at Vancouver’s Old City Cemetery. This cemetery on Mill Plain and Grand Boulevard has been subject to significant recent vandalism. Students will record grave markers from the 19th and early 20th centuries to learn about the history of Vancouver and to set a baseline condition for the headstones to help in their protection and management.
“We are conducting this project to help train students, but also to serve the City of Vancouver and the Central Park neighborhood Association,” said Wilson. “We hope to bring additional attention to this amazing historical place that has such a close tie to Fort Vancouver.”

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site is an unparalleled archaeological laboratory, comprising the remains of Fort Vancouver, the ca. 1825-1860 regional headquarters and supply depot for the Hudson’s Bay Company, and Vancouver Barracks, the first (ca. 1849-2010) permanent U.S. Army post and command center in the Pacific Northwest.

The field school will run from June 16 through July 23, 2011 at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. The public is welcome to visit Tuesday through Saturday, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

More information about the history of the Village is available on the park’s website at: http://www.nps.gov/fova/historyculture/the-village.htm

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