Posted by: wadahp | July 15, 2010

EXHIBITS, FAIR, AND LECTURES FOCUS ON THE ARTS AND CRAFTS MOVEMENT

Exhibition travels in Washington State
The Arts & Crafts Movement in the Pacific Northwest
 
Washington State History Museum, Tacoma (August 7 through November 28, 2010)
www.washingtonhistory.org 1 (800) BE THERE
 
Whatcom Museum at the Lightcatcher, Bellingham (December 18 through May 15, 2011).
www.whatcommuseum.org (360) 778-8930
 
and
 
13th Annual Historic Seattle Bungalow Fair and Arts & Crafts lectures
Show and Sale of Antiques, Contemporary Furniture and Decorative Arts
 
Town Hall Seattle, 1119 Eighth Avenue at Seneca Street, Seattle
Saturday, September 25 from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday, September 26, 2010 from 10 am to 4 pm.
 
 
FAIR AND LECTURES
 
13th Annual Historic Seattle Bungalow Fair and Arts & Crafts lectures
Show and Sale of Antiques, Contemporary Furniture and Decorative Arts
 
Town Hall Seattle, 1119 Eighth Avenue at Seneca Street, Seattle
Saturday, September 25 from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday, September 26, 2010 from 10 am to 4 pm.

Co-sponsored by Old House Journal, Old House Interiors, Arts & Crafts Homes, Style 1900, and the Inn at Virginia Mason

Plan your trip to the Pacific Northwest to coincide with the 2010 Bungalow Fair, the premier event of its kind in the Pacific Northwest. Historic Seattle’s popular weekend takes place at Town Hall Seattle, 1119 Eighth Avenue at Seneca Street, Saturday, September 25 from 10 am to 5 pm and Sunday, September 26, 2010 from 10 am to 4 pm. The former Church of Christ, Scientist provides a warm and inviting setting for a show and sale of  fifty of the nation’s leading designers and craftspeople in metal, tile, glass, textiles, ceramics, and lighting, antique dealers, architects, and interior designers. Lectures are: Artistic Leather of the Arts and Crafts Era by Daniel Lees, whose new publication is the first comprehensive study of Arts & Crafts leather; Behold the Day: The Color Block Prints of Frances Gearhart by Susan Futterman based on the outstanding exhibition of the artist’s work she curated at the Pasadena Museum of California Art and the catalog she edited; and Craftsman Style and the Great Boom: Building Portland’s Classic Arts & Crafts Neighborhoods by James S. Heuer, a passionate researcher and authority on leading Portland designers of the period. For information and registration, contact Historic Seattle: www.historicseattle.org or (206) 622-6952

EXHIBIT

The Arts & Crafts Movement in the Pacific Northwest, the outstanding exhibit organized by the Museum of History & Industry, Seattle, is now traveling throughout Washington State.

The exhibition showcases significant buildings and interiors, furniture, glass, metalwork, ceramics, textiles, fine arts, graphics and book arts, and photography with over 175 objects drawn from public and private collections and over 130 reproduced graphics. Curators for the exhibition are Lawrence Kreisman, Program Director of Historic Seattle and Glenn Mason, co-owner of Cultural Images, a museum and historical society consulting firm.

            The Pacific Northwest was active in disseminating information on the Arts and Crafts movement, displaying the most important producers of work in America at its fairs and in its art galleries, and advertising and selling these wares in its shops and department stores. A vibrant arts community banded together to support one another, to learn the latest methods of working in clay, metal, glass, and wood, and to produce work that was often comparable to the better known work of East and Midwest and California craftspeople. School children were brought up with a respect for handwork and with skills that would serve them well in building homes, making furniture, shaping metal work, doing embroidery, china painting, jewelry, and basketry—“beautiful necessities.” Ultimately, their view of the world changed as they became more attuned to the value of harmony, balance, color, and proportion in shaping a supportive environment.

            The Arts & Crafts Movement in the Pacific Northwest is based on the critically acclaimed publication by the same title by Kreisman and Mason (Timber Press, Portland, 2007). The book explores the ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement within a theme of regional identity, which found fertile ground in Washington and Oregon. Both states participated actively in the national Arts and Crafts Movement encouraged by exposure at two world’s fairs that put the Pacific Northwest on the national and international map, Portland’s Lewis & Clark Centennial Exposition (1905) and Seattle’s Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909).  There were significant contributions to a broad range of architecture and design arts, some of the most successful strongly influenced by the remarkable setting, climate, local raw materials, crafts of native inhabitants, and exposure to Pacific Rim cultures.   

Partial funding for the exhibition comes from 4Culture, Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs, and ArtsFund.

Historic Seattle, founded in 1974, is the only city-wide nonprofit membership organization dedicated to the preservation of Seattle’s architectural legacy.  Historic Seattle advocates for and participates in the thoughtful preservation and rehabilitation of historic buildings, landscapes, and architectural artifacts. 

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